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Paul Forrester is a respected corporate finance and securities lawyer whose practice is especially focused on structured credit, including collateralized loan obligations, energy (including oil and gas, utilities, shipping, refinery and pipeline) financings and project development, and financing (especially concerning renewable energy, industrial, petrochemical, power and transportation projects and infrastructure).

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On 5 March 2021, ICE Benchmark Administration (“IBA”), the administrator of LIBOR, released the much anticipated feedback statement (“Cessation Statement”) reporting the results of its 4 December 2020 Consultation on Potential Cessation. IBA consulted on the issue of LIBOR publication cessation because “a majority of LIBOR panel banks had communicated to IBA that they would not be willing to continue contributing to the relevant LIBOR settings after [the proposed cessation] dates.” Pursuant to the Cessation Statement, IBA intends to cease publication of (i) all GBP, EUR, CHF and JPY LIBOR settings, and the 1 Week and 2 Month USD LIBOR settings immediately following the LIBOR publication on 31 December 2021, and (ii) the Overnight and 1, 3, 6 and 12 Month USD LIBOR settings immediately following the LIBOR publication on 30 June 2023, subject to any rights of the UK Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”), the regulatory supervisor of IBA, to compel IBA to continue publication using a changed methodology. Individual non-confidential responses to the consultation, of the 55 responses received, can be viewed on the IBA website.

Continue Reading IBA Sets LIBOR Publication Cessation Dates and Triggers a LIBOR Transition Event

In testimony on Wednesday, February 24, 2021 before the United States House of Representatives Committee on Financial Services, the Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Jerome Powell, responded to questions regarding LIBOR transition from Representative Brad Sherman (D-CA), Chairman of the Investor Protection, Entrepreneurship and Capital Markets Subcommittee. Sherman had asked Powell: “In your view, is it necessary to have federal legislation to have a smooth transition after June 2023 when LIBOR is no longer published?”

Continue Reading US FRB Chair Powell Signals Support for Federal LIBOR Transition Assistance Legislation

As preparation for the transition from the London Interbank Offered Rate and similar interbank offered rates to replacement benchmark interest rates quickly accelerates, we explore a number of recent core global developments affecting structured finance products.

Read the full article from the Winter 2020 issue of our Structured Finance Bulletin.

On November 30, 2020, ICE Benchmark Administration (“IBA”), the administrator of U.S. Dollar LIBOR (“USD LIBOR”) and other IBORs, lowered the pressure with respect to the upcoming cessation of USD LIBOR. IBA announced that, following a consultation in December and January, (i) it intends to cease publication of 1-week and 2-month USD LIBOR at the

On November 30, 2020, ICE Benchmark Administration Limited (“IBA”) announced its intention, in early December 2020, to consult on the proposed cessation of the publication of:

  • the one-week and two-month USD LIBOR settings immediately following the LIBOR publication on December 31, 2021; and
  • the overnight and one-, three-, six- and 12-month USD LIBOR settings immediately following the LIBOR publication on June 30, 2023.

IBA expects to close the consultation for feedback by the end of January 2021. IBA also noted that any publication of the overnight and one-, three-, six- and 12-month USD LIBOR settings based on panel bank submissions beyond December 31, 2021, will need to comply with applicable regulations, including as to representativeness.


Continue Reading ICE Benchmark Administration to Consult Regarding Cessation of 1-Week and 2-Month USD LIBOR by December 31, 2021, and of Other Tenors by June 30, 2023

On November 18, 2020, ICE Benchmark Administration (“IBA”), the authorized administrator of LIBOR regulated by the UK Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”), announced that it will consult on its intention to cease publication of all tenors of euro, sterling, Swiss franc and yen LIBOR after December 31, 2021, subject to confirmation following IBA’s consultation and any rights of the FCA to compel continued publication by IBA. IBA is still in discussions with the FCA, official sector bodies, and panel banks regarding the future of US Dollar LIBOR.

Continue Reading “The End is Nigh”: UK FCA Issues Consultations Regarding Expected New Benchmark Powers in Response to ICE Benchmark Announcement; ISDA Issues Related Statement

The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”), and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (collectively, the “Agencies”) released an Interagency Statement on Reference Rates for Loans on November 6, 2020, in which they reiterated that they do not endorse SOFR—the Secured Overnight Financing Rate—or any other specific replacement rate for the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), for use in loan transactions.

Continue Reading “To SOFR or Not to SOFR?”: Prudential Banking Regulators Encourage Fallback Provisions to an “Appropriate” LIBOR Replacement Rate

In a detailed 25-page memorandum to U.S. prudential banking regulators,[1] the Alternative Reference Rates Committee detailed concerns regarding the transition from LIBOR to SOFR and possible effects on current U.S. bank regulatory capital and liquidity requirements. In the memorandum, the ARRC makes several preliminary recommendations regarding changes to such requirements, in order to facilitate such transition and avoid unintended disincentives or other adverse regulatory consequences.

Continue Reading ARRC Requests Changes to Bank Regulatory Capital and Liquidity Requirements to Facilitate Transition from LIBOR to SOFR

On October 28, 2020, New York State Senator Kevin Thomas introduced Senate Bill S9070, which would add a new Article 12 to New York’s Uniform Commercial Code that substantially adopts the language from the proposed legislative solution produced by the Alternative Reference Rates Committee (ARRC) in March 2020. For some market participants,[1] this announcement may trigger hearing the Halleluiah chorus from Handel’s Messiah, while others may still be asking why it took so long, and still others may be asking why bother given its potential limitations.[2]

Continue Reading LIBOR Transition Assistance Legislation Introduced in New York State Senate